Abstract Submission Opens: 05 November 2022

Next Round Registration Date: 29 February 2024

Scientific Sessions

Scientific Sessions

Session 1Cancer

Cancer is a disease characterized by the abnormal growth and spread of cells in the body. Normally, cells in the body grow and divide in a controlled manner, but in cancer, this process is disrupted, leading to the formation of a mass of abnormal cells, known as a tumor. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors are not cancerous and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant tumors are cancerous and can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. There are many different types of cancer, each with its own unique characteristics and risk factors. Some common types of cancer include breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and skin cancer. Risk factors for cancer include genetics, age, lifestyle factors such as tobacco use and diet, exposure to environmental toxins, and certain medical conditions. Cancer can be treated using a variety of approaches, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and hormone therapy. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of cancer, as well as other factors such as the patient’s overall health and preferences. Prevention is an important aspect of cancer control, and strategies such as maintaining a healthy lifestyle, getting regular cancer screenings, and avoiding exposure to environmental toxins can help reduce the risk of developing cancer. Additionally, advances in cancer research continue to lead to the development of new treatments and prevention strategies that offer hope for improving outcomes for cancer patients.

Similar conferences :Cancer meetings |Oncology conferences |Cancer research conferences |Tumor biology conferences | Cancer therapy conferences | Cancer science conferences | Cancer symposiums | Cancer workshopsCancer forums |Cancer congressCancer summits |Cancer seminarsCancer retreatsCancer events |Cancer lecturesCancer roundtablesCancer panelsCancer colloquiumsCancer think tanksTumor conferences |Cancer researchMeetings Oncology symposiumsTumor biology meetingsCancer therapy meetingsCancer science meetings |  World Cancer Congress | Congress of Radiology |

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Session 2Radiology

Radiology is a medical specialty that uses medical imaging techniques, such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI scans, and ultrasound, to diagnose and treat a variety of medical conditions, including cancer. Radiologists are medical doctors who specialize in interpreting these images to help diagnose medical conditions, and work closely with other healthcare professionals to develop and implement treatment plans. In the context of cancer, radiology plays a critical role in the diagnosis, staging, and monitoring of cancer. Imaging techniques can be used to detect the presence of tumors, determine the size and location of tumors, and assess the extent to which cancer has spread to other parts of the body. This information is used to develop a treatment plan that may involve surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or other treatments. Radiology also plays a key role in monitoring the progress of cancer treatment. Imaging techniques can be used to assess the response of tumors to treatment and determine whether cancer has spread or returned after treatment. Advances in radiology technology have led to the development of new imaging techniques that are increasingly precise and less invasive. For example, positron emission tomography (PET) scans can be used to detect the metabolic activity of cancer cells, allowing for more accurate staging of cancer and monitoring of treatment response. Additionally, interventional radiology techniques, such as image-guided biopsies and minimally invasive tumor ablation procedures, can be used to diagnose and treat cancer without the need for surgery. Overall, radiology is an essential component of cancer care, providing critical diagnostic and monitoring information that helps guide treatment decisions and improve patient outcomes.

Similar conferences: Radiology colloquium |Radiology forumRadiology workshop |Tumor colloquiums |Radiology seminarRadiology conventionRadiology exhibition |Oncology research events |Cancer science events |Tumor board conferencesTumor meetings | World Cancer Congress | Congress of Radiology | 

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Session 3Oncology

Oncology is the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. It encompasses a wide range of medical specialties, including medical oncology (the use of chemotherapy and other medications to treat cancer), surgical oncology (the use of surgery to remove tumors), and radiation oncology (the use of radiation therapy to treat cancer). Oncologists work closely with other healthcare professionals, such as radiologists, pathologists, and nurses, to provide comprehensive care to cancer patients. They also collaborate with researchers and scientists to develop and test new cancer therapies, and to advance our understanding of the underlying biology of cancer. In addition to treating cancer patients, oncologists also play an important role in cancer prevention and screening. They may work with individuals who are at high risk of developing cancer due to genetic or environmental factors, and provide guidance on lifestyle changes and other measures that can reduce their risk of developing cancer. They may also work with public health organizations to develop and promote cancer screening programs, which can help detect cancer at an early stage when it is more treatable. Overall, the field of oncology is focused on improving outcomes for cancer patients and advancing our understanding of cancer biology and treatment.

Similar conferences: Oncology seminars |Oncology events |Oncology roundtables |Oncology colloquiumsRadiology conferenceImaging congress |Radiologic imaging conference |Diagnostic imaging congress | Medical imaging conference |Radiography congress Radiology |symposium Radiology meetingRadiology colloquium |Radiology forumRadiology workshop |Tumor colloquiums |Radiology seminarRadiology conventionRadiology exhibition |Oncology research events |Cancer science events|Tumor board conferencesTumor meetings | World Cancer Congress | Congress of Radiology |

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Session 4Cancer Science

Cancer science is a broad field that encompasses many different areas of research focused on understanding the biology of cancer and developing new approaches for cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Some of the key areas of cancer science research include:

  • Cancer genetics and genomics: studying the genetic mutations and changes that occur in cancer cells, as well as identifying inherited genetic factors that increase the risk of developing cancer.
  • Cancer biology: investigating the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie cancer development and progression.
  • Cancer immunology: studying how the immune system interacts with cancer cells, and developing immunotherapies that can harness the immune system to fight cancer.
  • Cancer pharmacology: developing and testing new drugs and therapies for the treatment of cancer.
  • Cancer epidemiology: investigating patterns and causes of cancer in populations, and identifying factors that contribute to cancer risk.
  • Cancer imaging and diagnosis: developing and improving imaging techniques for the early detection and diagnosis of cancer.
  • Cancer prevention: identifying lifestyle and environmental factors that increase the risk of developing cancer, and developing strategies for cancer prevention.

The field of cancer science is rapidly advancing, with new discoveries and breakthroughs emerging on a regular basis. These advances are leading to the development of new and more effective cancer therapies, as well as improved methods for cancer prevention and diagnosis.

Similar conferences:| Tumor biology meetingsCancer therapy meetingsCancer science meetings |Oncology workshops |Oncology congresses |Oncology seminars |Oncology events |Oncology roundtables |Oncology colloquiums Radiology conferenceImaging congress |Radiologic imaging conference |Diagnostic imaging congress | Medical imaging conference |Radiography congress Radiology |

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Session 5Cancer Metabolism

Cancer metabolism is the study of the metabolic changes that occur in cancer cells compared to normal cells. Cancer cells have different metabolic requirements than normal cells, and they often rely on different metabolic pathways to obtain the energy and nutrients they need to grow and divide. One of the key metabolic changes in cancer cells is the “Warburg effect,” which refers to the fact that cancer cells often rely on glycolysis, a process that converts glucose to lactate, even in the presence of oxygen. This is in contrast to normal cells, which typically use oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy in the presence of oxygen. Cancer cells also often have altered lipid metabolism, with increased fatty acid synthesis and uptake. They may also have increased amino acid metabolism, particularly of glutamine, which can provide the cells with the necessary building blocks for growth and division. Understanding the metabolic changes that occur in cancer cells has led to the development of new cancer therapies that target metabolic pathways. For example, drugs that inhibit enzymes involved in glycolysis or fatty acid synthesis have shown promise in preclinical studies as potential cancer treatments. In addition, targeting cancer metabolism may also enhance the effectiveness of other cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Researchers continue to study cancer metabolism in order to identify new targets for cancer treatment and develop new therapies that can be used to effectively treat cancer.

Similar conferences:Cancer symposiums | Cancer workshopsCancer forums |Cancer congressCancer summits |Cancer seminarsCancer retreatsCancer events |Cancer lecturesCancer roundtablesCancer panelsCancer colloquiums

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Session 6Cancer Biomarkers

Cancer biomarkers are molecules or substances that can be found in blood, urine, or other body fluids or tissues that indicate the presence of cancer. Biomarkers can be used for cancer diagnosis, monitoring the progression of cancer, and predicting treatment outcomes. There are many different types of cancer biomarkers, including proteins, DNA, RNA, and metabolites. Some common cancer biomarkers include prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for prostate cancer, CA-125 for ovarian cancer, and HER2/neu for breast cancer. Biomarker testing can be used to help diagnose cancer and determine the most effective treatment plan. For example, some biomarkers can help determine if a tumor is responsive to a particular type of chemotherapy or if it is more likely to respond to immunotherapy. Biomarker testing can also help monitor the response to treatment and detect cancer recurrence. Researchers are actively investigating new cancer biomarkers and developing new biomarker tests that can improve cancer diagnosis and treatment. The use of biomarkers is a promising area of cancer research that may lead to more personalized and effective cancer treatment in the future.

Similar conferences: Cancer roundtablesCancer panelsCancer colloquiumsCancer think tanksTumor conferences |Cancer researchMeetings Oncology symposiumsTumor biology meetingsCancer therapy meetingsCancer science meetings |Oncology workshops |Oncology congresses |Oncology seminars |Oncology events

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Session 7Cancer Diagnosis

Cancer diagnosis is the process of determining whether a person has cancer or not. It typically involves a combination of tests and procedures, including imaging tests, laboratory tests, and biopsy. Imaging tests such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans can help identify the presence of abnormal tissues or tumors in the body. These tests can also help determine the location and size of the tumor, as well as whether the cancer has spread to other parts of the body. Laboratory tests, such as blood tests and urine tests, can help detect the presence of certain substances in the body that may indicate the presence of cancer. For example, elevated levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the blood may indicate the presence of prostate cancer. A biopsy is a procedure in which a small piece of tissue is removed from the body and examined under a microscope to determine if cancer is present. There are several different types of biopsy procedures, including needle biopsy, core biopsy, and surgical biopsy. Once a diagnosis of cancer is made, further testing may be required to determine the extent of the cancer and the best course of treatment. This may include additional imaging tests, such as CT scans or MRI scans, and laboratory tests to determine the specific type of cancer and whether it has spread to other parts of the body. Early detection and diagnosis of cancer are important for successful treatment outcomes. Regular cancer screenings and check-ups can help identify cancer at an early stage, when it is more treatable.

Similar conferences:  Radiology workshop |Tumor colloquiums |Radiology seminarRadiology conventionRadiology exhibition |Oncology research events |Cancer science events |Tumor board conferencesTumor meetings | World Cancer Congress | Congress of Radiology | 

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Session 8Cancer Genetics

Cancer genetics is the study of how changes or mutations in genes can lead to the development of cancer. Genetic mutations can occur spontaneously or can be inherited from a parent. Some genetic mutations can increase the risk of developing certain types of cancer, while others are directly linked to the development of cancer. One common type of genetic mutation that can lead to cancer is a mutation in tumor suppressor genes. Tumor suppressor genes normally function to prevent cells from growing and dividing too rapidly, but mutations in these genes can allow cells to grow and divide uncontrollably, leading to the development of cancer. Another type of genetic mutation that can lead to cancer is a mutation in oncogenes, which normally function to promote cell growth and division. Mutations in oncogenes can cause cells to grow and divide uncontrollably, leading to the development of cancer.

Genetic testing can be used to identify mutations that increase the risk of developing certain types of cancer, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, which increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Additionally, genetic testing can be used to guide cancer treatment by identifying specific mutations in cancer cells that can be targeted by precision medicine.

Researchers are continuing to study cancer genetics in order to identify new mutations that are linked to cancer development and to develop new targeted therapies that can be used to treat these mutations. Additionally, ongoing research is focused on developing new screening methods that can detect cancer at an early stage, when it is more treatable.

Similar conferences: Medical imaging conference |Radiography congress Radiology |symposium Radiology meetingRadiology colloquium |Radiology forumRadiology workshop

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Session 9Cancer Immunotherapy

Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. It works by targeting cells that are rapidly dividing, which is a characteristic of cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs can be given by mouth or injection, and they travel throughout the body to reach cancer cells wherever they may be. Chemotherapy can be used to treat a wide range of cancers, including breast cancer, lung cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia. It may be used alone or in combination with other treatments such as surgery and radiation therapy. One advantage of chemotherapy is that it can be effective in treating cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. However, chemotherapy drugs can also affect normal cells that divide rapidly, such as those in the hair follicles, bone marrow, and digestive system. This can cause side effects such as hair loss, fatigue, nausea, and an increased risk of infections. Chemotherapy is constantly evolving, with ongoing research aimed at improving the effectiveness and safety of the treatment. For example, researchers are developing new types of chemotherapy drugs that are more targeted and less toxic to normal cells. Additionally, ongoing research is focused on identifying biomarkers that can predict which patients are most likely to respond to chemotherapy, allowing for more personalized cancer treatment.

Similar conferences: Tumor colloquiums |Radiology seminarRadiology conventionRadiology exhibition |Oncology research events |Cancer science events

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Session 10Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. It works by targeting cells that are rapidly dividing, which is a characteristic of cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs can be given by mouth or injection, and they travel throughout the body to reach cancer cells wherever they may be. Chemotherapy can be used to treat a wide range of cancers, including breast cancer, lung cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia. It may be used alone or in combination with other treatments such as surgery and radiation therapy. One advantage of chemotherapy is that it can be effective in treating cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. However, chemotherapy drugs can also affect normal cells that divide rapidly, such as those in the hair follicles, bone marrow, and digestive system. This can cause side effects such as hair loss, fatigue, nausea, and an increased risk of infections. Chemotherapy is constantly evolving, with ongoing research aimed at improving the effectiveness and safety of the treatment. For example, researchers are developing new types of chemotherapy drugs that are more targeted and less toxic to normal cells. Additionally, ongoing research is focused on identifying biomarkers that can predict which patients are most likely to respond to chemotherapy, allowing for more personalized cancer treatment.

Similar conferences:Cancer think tanksTumor conferences |Cancer researchMeetings Oncology symposiumsTumor biology meetingsCancer therapy meetingsCancer science meetings |Oncology workshops |Oncology congresses |Oncology seminars |Oncology events |Oncology roundtables |Oncology colloquiumsRadiology conferenceImaging congress |Radiologic imaging conference |Diagnostic imaging congress | Medical imaging conference |Radiography congress Radiology |symposium Radiology meetingRadiology colloquium |Radiology forumRadiology workshop

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Session 11Radiation Therapy

Radiation therapy, also known as radiotherapy, is a common treatment for cancer that uses high-energy radiation to target and kill cancer cells. The goal of radiation therapy is to destroy cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy cells. Radiation therapy may be used alone or in combination with other cancer treatments such as chemotherapy or surgery. It may be used to treat many types of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and brain tumors, among others. Radiation therapy can be delivered in two main ways: external beam radiation and internal radiation. External beam radiation involves directing a beam of radiation from a machine outside the body towards the cancerous area. Internal radiation involves placing a radioactive source inside the body close to the cancerous area. Radiation therapy can cause side effects, such as fatigue, skin irritation, and nausea, but these usually go away after treatment is completed. The side effects can vary depending on the area being treated and the dose of radiation given. Your doctor will discuss the potential side effects with you and provide you with strategies to manage them.

Similar conferences: Cancer events |Cancer lecturesCancer roundtablesCancer panelsCancer colloquiumsCancer think tanksTumor conferences |Cancer researchMeetings Oncology symposiumsTumor biology meetingsCancer therapy meetingsCancer science meetings |Oncology workshops |Oncology congresses |Oncology seminars |Oncology events |Oncology roundtables

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Session 12Targeted Therapy

Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs or other substances to target specific molecules or pathways that are involved in the growth and survival of cancer cells. Unlike traditional chemotherapy, which can affect both cancer cells and normal cells, targeted therapy aims to selectively target cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Targeted therapy drugs work by interfering with specific proteins or receptors that are involved in cancer cell growth and division, or by targeting other molecular abnormalities that are specific to cancer cells. Some targeted therapy drugs work by blocking the signals that cancer cells use to grow and divide, while others work by triggering an immune response against cancer cells. Targeted therapy is currently used to treat several types of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and leukemia. Some common targeted therapy drugs include trastuzumab for breast cancer, imatinib for chronic myelogenous leukemia, and vemurafenib for melanoma. Targeted therapy has several advantages over traditional chemotherapy. It can be more effective than chemotherapy in some cases, and it can also have fewer side effects because it targets only cancer cells. However, targeted therapy is not effective for all types of cancer, and some patients may develop resistance to the drugs over time. Researchers are continuing to develop new targeted therapy drugs and to identify new molecular targets that can be exploited for cancer treatment. Additionally, ongoing research is focused on identifying biomarkers that can predict which patients are most likely to respond to targeted therapy, allowing for more personalized cancer treatment.

Similar conferences: Oncology colloquiums Radiology conferenceImaging congress |Radiologic imaging conference |Diagnostic imaging congress | Medical imaging conference |Radiography congress Radiology |symposium Radiology meetingRadiology colloquium

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Session 13Photodynamic Therapy

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment that uses a photosensitizing agent, which is activated by light of a specific wavelength, to destroy cancer cells. The photosensitizing agent is typically administered to the patient either topically or intravenously, and accumulates preferentially in cancer cells. When the agent is activated by light, it produces a form of oxygen that is toxic to cancer cells, leading to their destruction. PDT has several advantages over other cancer treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. It is minimally invasive, and does not require the use of ionizing radiation or toxic drugs, which can cause significant side effects. PDT also has the potential to selectively target cancer cells, while sparing healthy tissue. PDT is currently approved for the treatment of several types of cancer, including skin cancer, bladder cancer, and certain types of lung and esophageal cancer. It is also being studied as a potential treatment for other types of cancer, including brain and breast cancer.

One challenge with PDT is that the photosensitizing agents can only be activated by light of a specific wavelength, which can limit the depth of penetration into tissues. However, researchers are exploring ways to overcome this limitation by using new types of photosensitizing agents and developing novel light sources. Overall, PDT is a promising cancer treatment that has the potential to improve patient outcomes while minimizing side effects. However, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms of action and optimize its use in the clinic.

Similar conferences: Tumor colloquiums |Radiology seminarRadiology conventionRadiology exhibition |Oncology research events |Cancer science events

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Session 14Biomarker Testing

Biomarker testing is the analysis of biological markers that indicate the presence or progression of a disease, including cancer. Biomarkers can be molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, or metabolites that are found in the blood, urine, or tissue samples of patients with cancer. Biomarker testing is used to help diagnose cancer, determine its stage and prognosis, and guide treatment decisions. The different types of biomarkers used in cancer diagnosis and treatment include tumor markers, genetic markers, and immunohistochemistry markers. Biomarker testing is important because it can help physicians tailor cancer treatment to the individual patient and identify patients who are at a higher risk of developing certain cancers, allowing for earlier detection and intervention. However, biomarker testing is not always definitive, and results may need to be interpreted in the context of other clinical factors.

Similar conferences: Medical imaging conference |Radiography congress Radiology |symposium Radiology meetingRadiology colloquium |Radiology forumRadiology workshop

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Session 15Cancer Stem Cells

Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of cells within a tumor that are thought to be responsible for tumor growth and recurrence. These cells have the ability to self-renew, differentiate into different cell types, and resist chemotherapy and radiation therapy. CSCs are similar to normal stem cells in many ways, including their ability to divide and differentiate into multiple cell types. CSCs were first identified in the early 2000s in studies of leukemia and later in solid tumors such as breast, brain, and colon cancer. Since then, researchers have been working to understand the biology of CSCs and develop therapies that target these cells. One approach to targeting CSCs is to identify and inhibit the specific signaling pathways and genes that are responsible for their self-renewal and survival. For example, some CSCs rely on the Notch signaling pathway for their survival, so targeting this pathway may be an effective way to kill these cells. Another approach is to develop therapies that selectively target CSCs while sparing normal stem cells, which are essential for tissue regeneration. The development of therapies that target CSCs is still in the early stages, and much more research is needed to fully understand the biology of these cells and how best to target them. However, targeting CSCs has the potential to significantly improve cancer treatment by preventing tumor recurrence and improving patient outcomes.

Similar conferences: Cancer meetings |Oncology conferences |Cancer research conferences |Tumor biology conferences | Cancer therapy conferences | Cancer science conferences | Cancer symposiums | Cancer workshopsCancer forums |Cancer congressCancer summits |Cancer seminarsCancer retreatsCancer events |Cancer lecturesCancer roundtablesCancer panelsCancer colloquiums

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Session 16Cancer Biology Research

Cancer biology research is a field of study focused on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression. The goal of cancer biology research is to identify the genetic, epigenetic, and biochemical changes that drive cancer growth, with the ultimate aim of developing new treatments and improving patient outcomes.

Some key areas of cancer biology research include:

  1. Cancer genetics: Researchers study the genetic mutations and alterations that occur in cancer cells and how these changes contribute to cancer development and progression. This research has led to the development of targeted therapies that specifically target cancer cells with certain genetic mutations.
  2. Tumor microenvironment: Cancer cells interact with their surrounding environment, including blood vessels, immune cells, and other types of cells. Understanding how these interactions influence cancer growth and response to treatment is a critical area of cancer biology research.
  3. Epigenetics: Epigenetic changes, such as modifications to DNA or histones, can alter gene expression and contribute to cancer development. Researchers are studying how these changes occur and how they can be targeted for cancer treatment.
  4. Immunotherapy: Immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving area of cancer biology research that involves harnessing the power of the immune system to target and eliminate cancer cells.
  5. Biomarkers: Biomarkers are measurable indicators of a biological process, such as cancer growth or response to treatment. Researchers are working to identify new biomarkers that can help predict treatment response and improve patient outcomes.

Cancer biology research is a multidisciplinary field that involves collaboration between researchers from a variety of disciplines, including molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, immunology, and more. The results of cancer biology research have led to significant advances in cancer treatment, including the development of targeted therapies, immunotherapies, and other novel treatments.

Similar conferences: Oncology colloquiumsRadiology conferenceImaging congress |Radiologic imaging conference |Diagnostic imaging congress | Medical imaging conference |Radiography congress Radiology |symposium Radiology meetingRadiology colloquium

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Session 17Hematologic Malignancies

Hematologic malignancies are cancers that affect the blood and bone marrow. They are also known as blood cancers or hematological cancers. There are three main types of hematologic malignancies:

  1. Leukemia: Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells, specifically the white blood cells. It is characterized by the abnormal growth of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow, which can interfere with the production of normal blood cells.
  2. Lymphoma: Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system, which is part of the immune system. It is characterized by the abnormal growth of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the lymph nodes, spleen, or other lymphatic tissues.
  3. Myeloma: Myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell that produce antibodies. It is characterized by the abnormal growth of plasma cells in the bone marrow, which can interfere with the production of normal blood cells and weaken the bones.

Hematologic malignancies can cause a variety of symptoms, including fatigue, weakness, unexplained weight loss, and frequent infections. Treatment for hematologic malignancies depends on the type and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient’s age and overall health. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these treatments.

Research into hematologic malignancies is ongoing, and new treatments are being developed and tested. Clinical trials are a critical part of this research and provide opportunities for patients to access cutting-edge treatments that may not yet be widely available.

Similar conferences: Cancer events |Cancer lecturesCancer roundtablesCancer panelsCancer colloquiumsCancer think tanksTumor conferences |Cancer researchMeetings Oncology symposiumsTumor biology meetingsCancer therapy meetingsCancer science meetings |Oncology workshops |Oncology congresses |Oncology seminars |Oncology events |Oncology roundtables

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Session 18Cancer Pharmacology

Cancer pharmacology is the study of drugs used in the treatment of cancer. It involves the development, testing, and use of drugs that can prevent or slow the growth of cancer cells, kill cancer cells, or prevent the spread of cancer to other parts of the body. Cancer pharmacology is a rapidly evolving field, with new drugs and treatment strategies being developed and tested regularly.

There are several types of drugs used in cancer pharmacology, including:

  1. Chemotherapy: Chemotherapy drugs are used to kill cancer cells by disrupting their ability to grow and divide.
  2. Targeted therapy: Targeted therapy drugs are designed to target specific molecules or pathways involved in cancer growth and progression.
  3. Immunotherapy: Immunotherapy drugs work by stimulating the immune system to attack cancer cells.
  4. Hormone therapy: Hormone therapy drugs are used to treat cancers that are sensitive to hormones, such as breast and prostate cancer.
  5. Palliative care: Palliative care drugs are used to relieve symptoms associated with cancer, such as pain, nausea, and fatigue.

The development and testing of cancer drugs involve multiple phases of clinical trials, which aim to assess the safety and efficacy of the drugs in human patients. Once a drug is approved by regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), it can be used in clinical practice to treat cancer patients.

Cancer pharmacology is a complex and rapidly evolving field, and ongoing research is aimed at identifying new drugs and treatment strategies that can improve outcomes for cancer patients.

Similar conferences: Cancer meetings |Oncology conferences |Cancer research conferences |Tumor biology conferences | Cancer therapy conferences

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Session 19Tumor Imaging

Tumor imaging is a medical imaging technique used to visualize tumors or abnormal growths in the body. There are several types of tumor imaging techniques available, each with its own advantages and limitations. Some of the most commonly used tumor imaging techniques include:

  1. X-rays: X-rays are a simple and widely available imaging technique that can help detect tumors in some parts of the body. However, they are not as sensitive as other imaging techniques and may miss smaller tumors.
  2. Computed Tomography (CT): CT scans use X-rays to produce detailed cross-sectional images of the body. They are useful for detecting and characterizing tumors in different parts of the body.
  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): MRI uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to produce detailed images of the body. It is particularly useful for imaging soft tissues and can help detect tumors in the brain, spine, and other areas.
  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET): PET scans use a radioactive tracer to visualize metabolic activity in the body. This can help detect tumors and assess their response to treatment.
  5. Ultrasound: Ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images of the body. It is particularly useful for imaging tumors in the abdomen, pelvis, and other areas.
  6. Mammography: Mammography is a specialized type of X-ray used to image the breast. It is a commonly used screening tool for breast cancer.

Overall, tumor imaging is an important tool for detecting, characterizing, and monitoring tumors in the body. The choice of imaging technique depends on the type and location of the tumor, as well as other factors such as the patient’s age and medical history.

Similar conferences: Cancer meetings |Oncology conferences |Cancer research conferences |Tumor biology conferences | Cancer therapy conferences |Tumor board conferencesTumor meetings | World Cancer Congress | Congress of Radiology |

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Session 20Cancer Vaccines

Cancer vaccines are a type of immunotherapy that stimulate the immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells. Unlike traditional vaccines that prevent infectious diseases, cancer vaccines aim to treat or prevent cancer.

There are two main types of cancer vaccines: preventive and therapeutic. Preventive cancer vaccines are designed to prevent specific types of cancer by targeting viruses that can cause cancer, such as human papillomavirus (HPV) and hepatitis B virus. These vaccines work by training the immune system to recognize and eliminate virus-infected cells, thereby reducing the risk of developing cancer.

Therapeutic cancer vaccines, on the other hand, are designed to treat existing cancer by stimulating the immune system to attack cancer cells. These vaccines can be made from cancer cells or antigens (proteins) found on the surface of cancer cells. They work by priming the immune system to recognize and attack cancer cells, thereby slowing or stopping the growth of the tumor.

Although cancer vaccines have shown promising results in clinical trials, they are not yet widely available for most types of cancer. The development of cancer vaccines is complex and challenging, and researchers continue to explore ways to improve their efficacy and safety. However, the potential benefits of cancer vaccines make them an exciting area of research and hold promise for the future of cancer treatment and prevention.

Similar conferences: Tumor board conferencesTumor meetings | World Cancer Congress | Congress of Radiology |

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Session 21Cancer Epidemiology

Cancer epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of cancer in populations. Epidemiologists examine factors that influence cancer occurrence, such as demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, environmental exposures, and genetic predisposition. They use statistical methods to analyze data from population-based studies, including cancer registries and surveys, to identify patterns and trends in cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Some of the key findings in cancer epidemiology include variations in cancer incidence and mortality rates across different populations, with some groups at higher risk due to social, economic, and environmental factors. For example, some types of cancer are more prevalent in certain geographic regions, such as lung cancer in areas with high smoking rates or liver cancer in regions with high rates of hepatitis B and C infections.

Epidemiological studies have also helped identify risk factors for cancer, such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and exposure to carcinogens. These findings have informed public health interventions and policies aimed at reducing cancer incidence and mortality, such as tobacco control programs, cancer screening and early detection initiatives, and environmental regulations.

Overall, cancer epidemiology plays a critical role in understanding the burden of cancer on society and identifying effective strategies for prevention, early detection, and treatment.

Similar conferences: Tumor colloquiums |Radiology seminarRadiology conventionRadiology exhibition |Oncology research events |Cancer science events

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Session 22Cancer Prevention

Cancer prevention involves taking proactive measures to reduce the risk of developing cancer. It includes adopting a healthy lifestyle, such as quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, limiting alcohol consumption, and protecting your skin from the sun. Additionally, getting vaccinated against viruses such as HPV and hepatitis B can lower the risk of developing certain types of cancer. Regular cancer screenings can also help detect cancer early when it is most treatable. By following these strategies, you can reduce your risk of developing cancer and improve your overall health and well-being.

Similar conferences: Medical imaging conference |Radiography congress Radiology |symposium Radiology meetingRadiology colloquium |Radiology forumRadiology workshop

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Session 23Cancer Detection

Cancer detection refers to the process of identifying cancer in the body. Early detection of cancer is important because it can improve the chances of successful treatment and increase survival rates. There are several methods used for cancer detection, including:

  1. Imaging tests: These include X-rays, CT scans, MRI scans, ultrasound, and PET scans. These tests can help identify abnormal growths or masses in the body that may be cancerous.
  2. Biopsy: This involves the removal of a small sample of tissue from a suspected tumor, which is then examined under a microscope to determine if cancer is present.
  3. Blood tests: Some types of cancer produce certain substances that can be detected in the blood. Blood tests can be used to identify these substances and help diagnose cancer.
  4. Genetic testing: Certain genetic mutations are associated with an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. Genetic testing can help identify these mutations and help guide treatment decisions.
  5. Screening tests: These are tests that are performed on individuals who do not have any symptoms but are at high risk for developing certain types of cancer. Examples include mammograms for breast cancer and colonoscopies for colon cancer.

Similar conferences: Oncology seminars |Oncology events |Oncology roundtables |Oncology colloquiumsRadiology conferenceImaging congress |Radiologic imaging conference |Diagnostic imaging congress

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Session 24Tumor Pathology

Tumor pathology is the branch of pathology that focuses on the study of tumors, including their causes, diagnosis, and treatment. Tumors are abnormal growths of cells that can be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Pathologists play a key role in diagnosing tumors and determining their type and stage. They examine tissue samples obtained through biopsy or surgery, looking for characteristic features such as abnormal cell morphology, changes in tissue architecture, and genetic mutations that are associated with cancer. Pathologists also use a range of laboratory techniques to study tumor samples, including immunohistochemistry, molecular testing, and cytogenetics. These tests can help identify specific proteins or genetic mutations that are associated with different types of cancer, which can help guide treatment decisions. In addition to diagnosis, tumor pathology is also important for predicting the behavior of tumors and determining the most effective treatment options. Pathologists can use information about the type and stage of a tumor to estimate its likelihood of spreading and to recommend appropriate treatment options, such as surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Advances in tumor pathology have led to improved diagnosis and treatment of cancer, including the development of targeted therapies that are designed to selectively attack cancer cells while minimizing damage to healthy tissue. By studying the biology of tumors at the cellular and molecular level, tumor pathologists are helping to improve our understanding of cancer and to develop new approaches for preventing and treating this complex disease.

Similar conferences:  Tumor conferences |Cancer researchMeetings Oncology symposiumsTumor biology meetingsCancer therapy meetingsCancer science meetings |Oncology workshops |Oncology congresses

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Session 25Tumor invasion and Metastasis

Tumor invasion and metastasis are two related processes that occur when cancer cells spread from their original site to other parts of the body. Tumor invasion occurs when cancer cells break away from the primary tumor and invade nearby tissues and organs. This occurs when cancer cells gain the ability to break down the extracellular matrix, a complex network of proteins and carbohydrates that provides support to cells in tissues. Once cancer cells have invaded nearby tissues, they can continue to grow and form secondary tumors. Metastasis occurs when cancer cells break away from the primary tumor and travel to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. Once cancer cells reach a new location, they can form new tumors and continue to grow and spread. The process of invasion and metastasis is complex and involves multiple steps, including changes in gene expression, alterations in cell signaling pathways, and interactions with the surrounding microenvironment. Some cancers are more likely to metastasize than others, and the likelihood of metastasis can depend on factors such as the location and size of the primary tumor, the cancer’s stage, and the presence of specific genetic mutations. Treatment for metastatic cancer can be challenging, as cancer cells that have spread to other parts of the body are often more difficult to treat than those in the primary tumor. Treatment options may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. In some cases, surgery may also be used to remove metastatic tumors.

Similar conferences: Cancer retreatsCancer events |Cancer lecturesCancer roundtablesCancer panelsCancer colloquiumsCancer think tanks

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Session 26Childhood Cancers

Childhood cancers are cancers that occur in children under the age of 18. Although childhood cancers are rare, they are a significant cause of illness and death in children. The most common types of childhood cancers include leukemia, brain and nervous system tumors, lymphoma, and bone cancer. The causes of childhood cancers are not well understood, but researchers believe that genetic factors, exposure to radiation or certain chemicals, and immune system problems may play a role. However, in most cases, the cause of childhood cancer is not known. Symptoms of childhood cancer can vary depending on the type of cancer, but they can include unexplained fever, fatigue, weight loss, and pain. Diagnosis often involves a combination of physical examination, blood tests, imaging tests, and biopsies. Treatment for childhood cancer can include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplantation. The choice of treatment depends on the type and stage of cancer, as well as the child’s age and overall health. In general, children with cancer receive specialized care from a team of healthcare providers, including pediatric oncologists, nurses, and social workers. Although childhood cancer is a serious illness, many children with cancer can be successfully treated and go on to lead healthy, productive lives. Advances in cancer research have led to improvements in treatment and increased survival rates for many types of childhood cancer.

Similar conferences: Cancer science conferences | Cancer symposiums | Cancer workshopsCancer forums |Cancer congressCancer summits |Cancer seminars

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Session 27Cancer Research

Cancer research is the field of study focused on understanding the biology of cancer and developing new treatments to improve the lives of cancer patients. Researchers in this field work to identify the causes of cancer, explore new treatment options, and develop strategies for early detection and prevention of the disease. There are many different areas of cancer research, including basic research into the biology of cancer cells, translational research that seeks to apply basic research findings to the development of new therapies, and clinical research that tests new treatments in patientsBasic research in cancer focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development and spread of cancer. This research often involves studying cancer cells in the laboratory to identify the genetic and molecular changes that occur in these cells. Translational research in cancer involves taking the findings from basic research and applying them to the development of new treatments. This can involve testing new drugs in animal models or developing new diagnostic tools for early detection of cancer. Cancer research is a constantly evolving field, with new discoveries and breakthroughs being made all the time. While there is still much to learn about the causes and treatment of cancer, researchers in this field are making significant progress in improving the lives of cancer patients around the world.

Similar conferences: Cancer meetings |Oncology conferences |Cancer research conferences |Tumor biology conferences | Cancer therapy conferences |

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